My child has an extra tooth – what should I do?

Many children have either missing permanent teeth, or extra permanent teeth.  In a previous blog, I mentioned having a panoramic x-ray (panorex) taken to monitor your child’s dental development is important.    This is one of the reasons to have a panorex taken.  It will show any missing permanent teeth, and/or extra permanent teeth that your child might have.

In the case of extra teeth, once it has been determined to be an extra tooth, the best thing to do is have it removed.  Once the extra tooth is extracted, have the space closed using orthodontics.  If the extra tooth is not extracted, it can cause problems with the proper bite relationship, crowding, misalignment of dental midlines, and other orthodontic problems.

I had a 10 year old boy that had an extra front tooth that we determined was causing a misalignment of his upper teeth and anterior crowding.  We took the tooth out and placed brackets (braces) on his upper front teeth and closed the space with chain elastics.  He is now 13 years old and has a perfect smile.  If we had waited until now, the orthodontic treatment would have taken 3 to 4 times as long and would have increased the cost of treatment by about $2000.00.

I also had a young man that we took a panorex on at age 14.  We found 6 extra teeth growing in both his upper and lower jaws.  It was determined that this was something that was documented in his family history.   His parents elected to have them removed right away before much root development had occurred.  By doing this, he did not have any adverse effects from the extra teeth erupting and causing crowding of his permanent teeth that were already in place.

If you, or your dentist determine that your child has an extra tooth, or teeth, you should determine which tooth should be extracted and have it taken out as soon as possible.  Then, any problems caused by the eruption of that tooth should be corrected.  By taking care of the problem as early as possible, other dental problems and the associated cost of treatment can be kept to a minimum.  Thank you for your e-mailed questions.  If anyone else has a question, don’t hesitate to ask.  Questions can be e-mailed to drmax@drmaxwood.com.


Did you enjoy this post? Why not leave a comment below and continue the conversation, or subscribe to my feed and get articles like this delivered automatically each day to your feed reader.

comment_type == "trackback" || $comment->comment_type == "pingback" || ereg("", $comment->comment_content) || ereg("", $comment->comment_content)) { ?>

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

Dr Max, my son is six (one month shy of turning seven), and we just found out that he has an extra tooth (mesiodens) in the midline between his already erupted permanent teeth (upper). After consulting with the oral surgeon, his recommendation is to remove the extra tooth as it is causing a gap between the two permanent teeth. This extra tooth is also causing one permanent tooth to wiggle substantially.

At the same time, two of his incisors are about to erupt. According to the oral surgeon, without guarantee, that the eruption of these incisors may push the two front permanent teeth closer.

The suggested procedure is to cut about 3cm either on the lip or palate to extract the extra tooth.

My questions are:
1) Is there any other ways other than the extraction of the extra tooth? If so what could the consequences of this other option(s)?
2) What would be the worst case if we opt for the procedure to remove the extra tooth?
3) With the extraction procedure, what are the chances that it may damage his other permanent tooth especially the two right next to the extra tooth?
4) Can the procedure damage the nerves of other teeth and eventually damaging them as well as causing numbness around the gum?

Please give us some advice as your response will help us in our decision for our baby. Thank you so much.

comment_type == "trackback" || $comment->comment_type == "pingback" || ereg("", $comment->comment_content) || ereg("", $comment->comment_content)) { ?>

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

My 13yr old has an extra front tooth.dental offices don’t want to remove it because it;s logged between the 2 front teeth by the bone and nerve,is this common?What should i do and hesgrowing extra teeth on the bottom.sorry for the inproper writing just had stiches down on my right hand and i cant use my right hand to type.

comment_type == "trackback" || $comment->comment_type == "pingback" || ereg("", $comment->comment_content) || ereg("", $comment->comment_content)) { ?>

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

I just addressed your issue with my latest post. In my opinion, the sooner you have those extra teeth removed the better. They will cause problems with your child’s dental development. You may want to get a 2nd opinion on what you should do. My grandson, 6 years old, had the same problem. I diagnosed it on a Tuesday and removed the tooth 2 days later. Good luck and I hope everything works out.

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

No trackbacks/pingbacks yet.

Comments

comment_type != "trackback" && $comment->comment_type != "pingback" && !ereg("", $comment->comment_content) && !ereg("", $comment->comment_content)) { ?>

Dr Max, my son is six (one month shy of turning seven), and we just found out that he has an extra tooth (mesiodens) in the midline between his already erupted permanent teeth (upper). After consulting with the oral surgeon, his recommendation is to remove the extra tooth as it is causing a gap between the two permanent teeth. This extra tooth is also causing one permanent tooth to wiggle substantially.

At the same time, two of his incisors are about to erupt. According to the oral surgeon, without guarantee, that the eruption of these incisors may push the two front permanent teeth closer.

The suggested procedure is to cut about 3cm either on the lip or palate to extract the extra tooth.

My questions are:
1) Is there any other ways other than the extraction of the extra tooth? If so what could the consequences of this other option(s)?
2) What would be the worst case if we opt for the procedure to remove the extra tooth?
3) With the extraction procedure, what are the chances that it may damage his other permanent tooth especially the two right next to the extra tooth?
4) Can the procedure damage the nerves of other teeth and eventually damaging them as well as causing numbness around the gum?

Please give us some advice as your response will help us in our decision for our baby. Thank you so much.

comment_type != "trackback" && $comment->comment_type != "pingback" && !ereg("", $comment->comment_content) && !ereg("", $comment->comment_content)) { ?>

My 13yr old has an extra front tooth.dental offices don’t want to remove it because it;s logged between the 2 front teeth by the bone and nerve,is this common?What should i do and hesgrowing extra teeth on the bottom.sorry for the inproper writing just had stiches down on my right hand and i cant use my right hand to type.

comment_type != "trackback" && $comment->comment_type != "pingback" && !ereg("", $comment->comment_content) && !ereg("", $comment->comment_content)) { ?>

I just addressed your issue with my latest post. In my opinion, the sooner you have those extra teeth removed the better. They will cause problems with your child’s dental development. You may want to get a 2nd opinion on what you should do. My grandson, 6 years old, had the same problem. I diagnosed it on a Tuesday and removed the tooth 2 days later. Good luck and I hope everything works out.

Leave a comment

Line and paragraph breaks automatic, e-mail address never displayed, HTML allowed: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

(required)

(required)